History Image

Sacramento County History Overview



California Local Pin Marker Get To Know A Group

The Center for Sacramento History provides education about Sacramento’s past cultural heritage. It is funded by the city and county.

California Local Pin Marker Local History Digest

A Private Calif. Ranch Holds Important State History — And It Might Be in Danger

04/19/2024

Some residents fear development could destroy parts of the historic land.

San Francisco Is Ready to Apologize to Black Residents. Reparations Advocates Want More

02/26/2024

“An apology is just cotton candy rhetoric,” said the Rev. Amos C. Brown, a member of the San Francisco reparations advisory committee. “What we need is concrete actions.”

California Local Pin Marker Recent Articles

Carmichael Times logo LOCAL NEWS
Alice Astafan Shares Her Story

Retired Major General Highlights Achievements (and Challenges) in New Memoir

Image caption: The California mental health crisis is tied to both homelessness and rising crime.
UPDATE: California’s Mental Health Crisis: How We Got Here

How the California mental health crisis emerged out of the state’s history of deinstitutionalization and laws designed to protect the mentally ill, as well as the communities around them.

Carmichael Times logo LOCAL NEWS
Mira Loma High Celebrates Second Annual Black Renaissance Day

Mira Loma High School Spreads Awareness of Black History Month

Image caption:
Publishing in Paradise

Based in California’s most iconic vacation spot, Katherine Hill celebrates Tahoe Guide’s 42nd birthday.

Image caption: The 1965 law known as the Williamson Act has been responsible for keeping about half of California's farmland out of the hands of developers.
The Williamson Act: How the Law That Protects California’s Farmland Works

The Williamson Act, passed in 1965, now keeps more than 16 million acres of farmland out of the hands of developers. Here's how the law puts the brakes on the development of California agricultural properties.

Folsom Times logo LOCAL NEWS
Folsom to honor 100-year old WWII internment camp survivor, Army Veteran

Shigeru Ochi has seen and experienced a thing or two in his lifetime. The Folsom resident and World War Two Veteran turns 100 this week and the community is ready to honor him in large, not only for his birthday …

Folsom Times logo LOCAL NEWS
Future of Folsom’s iconic City Park train in hands of City Council

For more than three decades, local resident Terry Gold has operated and maintained the small scale Folsom Valley Railroad that is an iconic part of Folsom’s Lions Park.  With retirement and a residential relocation in sight for Gold, the future …

Sacramento News and Review logo LOCAL NEWS
Essay: What is a Conservative? Understanding how the term works in American politics

By John Patrick Leary The evergreen questions raised by the label “conservative” are: Conserving what and from whom? Let’s dispense with one popular answer to...

Folsom Times logo LOCAL NEWS
Folsom Council unanimously recommends 7 year railroad operating license

Over the last two months, the leaders and many volunteers of the Placerville and Sacramento Valley Railroad (PSVRR) have been juggling a lot of uncertainty in regards to the future of their organization with the looming renewal of their operating …

Featured

Old Sacramento Historic District Sacramento is an open-air museum of historic buildings.
Capital Collections
Sacramento’s rich past can be explored by visiting its many and varied historical museums.
Access to abortion in California is limited in many areas, though state laws protect a woman’s right to choose.
Abortion Rights in California, Explained
But even in California, access to abortion services in many areas remains limited.
California continues to work on legislation that would make voting easier.
Voting Rites
And more bills are on the way to help you make your mark on Election Day.
Over two weekends last October, residents of Santa Cruz and Watsonville  participated in demonstration rides aboard an electric streetcar on rails.
The ‘Rail Trail’ Movement, Explained
The heated controversy over what to do with abandoned railroad tracks
California transportation history runs from railroads to today’s car culture.
California’s History of Transportation: From Railroads to Highways
The history of transportation in California has shaped the state, from the earliest stagecoach to today’s car culture.
The California mental health crisis is tied to both homelessness and rising crime.
UPDATE: California’s Mental Health Crisis: How We Got Here
The making of Gov. Newsom's plan to help get mentally ill Californians into treatment.
Moss Landing in Monterey Bay is the world’s largest battery storage facility for solar and other renewable energy.
Solar Power and California’s Clean Energy Goals
How the sun is helping push the state toward 100 percent renewable energy.
From nitrates to arsenic to “forever chemicals,” California’s water supply faces a serious pollution threat.
Dirty Water: California Faces a Water Contamination Crisis
In a state that declares water a “human right,” more than 2 percent of its residents have no drinkable water.
The California Supreme Court has defined the state’s legal and political agenda for more than 170 years.
How the California Supreme Court Blazes Legal Trails
From its beginnings in the Gold Rush, the state Supreme Court continues to define the state today.
Among the events commemorated by E Clampus Vitus is the founding of the group’s first California chapter.
Atlas Absurdum
More than 1,400 markers across the state point the way to the past.
How California reclamation districts turned millions of acres of wetlands into fertile agricultural land, starting in the earliest days of the Gold Rush.
Reclamation Districts: Turning ‘Swamps’ Into Farmland
From its earliest days as a state, California has been trying to turn marshes into productive land.
Since the Gold Rush era, land reclamation has cost California 90 percent of its wetlands.
How Land Reclamation Hurts California’s Environment
The hidden price tag of “reclaiming” swamps and marshes as usable land.
Translated from the Greek, “Democracy” means “people power.” How much power do the people have in California?
People Power! What Is Democracy, and How Does It Work in California?
The Goddess of Democracy is alive and well in California, but that hasn’t always been true.
The Baldwin Hills area in South Los Angeles is one region where a state conservancy would keep open land accessible to the public.
California’s 10 State Conservancies: How They Protect Parks and Open Land
Starting in 1976, the legislature began creating agencies to buy up open land, and keep it open.
The 1965 law known as the Williamson Act has been responsible for keeping about half of California's farmland out of the hands of developers.
The Williamson Act: How the Law That Protects California’s Farmland Works
More than half of California farmland is under contracts that prevent its development.
Select Facebook Feed From Menu

Join Us Today!